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in education today. you are one of the sponsors, the national education association, of this incredible summit meeting. tell the folks watching now a little better about the who, what, when, where, why. >> we started an idea in a meeting with secretary duncan, what if we brought together the leaders, the ministers from the country's redoing an international assessment, and we did not dream it would come about to the extent it has. last year was such a positive experience from everyone. as i talked to fellow union presidents from around the world, their reaction was so positive. they went out to dinner together, had informal conversations, in addition to -- they said, "i spent more time with the minister of education than i did in three months, six months." the level of conversation really did what we know happens when you want collaboration. you have got to sit down and build those relationships. the big winners are students in education. >> so getting people to sit and talk with each other? >> yes, it is really important. if the minister of education and union president have such a poor relat
in education today. thank you for sitting with us. >> happy to be here. >> there was a summit last year. at the end of the summit they published a paper that had four -- 5 points. at the end, it came around teaching and it had to do with teacher evaluations. >> this is hard. we were talking about this this morning. the conversation is going on around the world, which is exciting, particularly for the united states. before i get your answer, we have to praise this administration for getting involved on in the -- involved in the international conversation. we have never done that before. we are part of that conversation, which i think is very positive for us. so, a teacher evaluation. every teacher knows they make a difference in how a child learns. they would not come to work if they did not believe that. the challenge is, how do you assess what they are achieving with kids? what everybody objects to within the profession is you cannot tell if you're doing a good job based on the score on a single test. what a child does on a single test, on a single day does not do justice to the child'
that has a lot of potential to open up better avenues for educators and districts to make better decisions and get evidence in a way and in some ways that type of tool would make what they're doing a lot easier. >> you are the designated responder here. >> thanks for bringing this great panel. i am not going to spend time adjusting all of them. it will make this proposal better and stronger. for the younger people in the audience may be 30 years you will be on a panel like this and somebody will ask what it was like before the apps store. people will be shocked not because you are old but they can't imagine life existed before the apps store. it is so incredible and what made the market? where does it come from? what it is is transparency about what you're getting and barriers to entry. what we want to do is take the entrepreneurial energy in the u.s. and around the world and use it to give teachers better tools and consumer report for educational technology to educate the entrepreneurial energy developing better schools so the panel has got it right in terms of what we are trying to do. t
that its economic growth is slowing and inflation is on the rise. when it comes to education, brazil ranks 53rd in the world. it is an issue the country needs to address so it can seize its momentum not be left on the sideline. and downtown, there are throwing up the buildings at a dizzying pace. but it takes more than muscle to lift the country. all of this prosperity was built on natural resources but of the country wants to do more than supply commodities to china, it needs human helped to. >> you will not find many skilled workers on the streets. it is here in the poor neighborhoods, not far from the business district, that you find that challenge. if this country ever wants to develop from an emerging economy, it is going to have to do a better job educating its population. gdp but the six largest and blow in education. >> she is an education campaign and fighting vested interest to change those figures. >> the political issue in brazil, there are 2 million voters that can decide an election. it is very hard to make changes. >> it is time for school in this neighborhood. this is the s
to photography classes. >> good evening. so this is the regular meeting of the board of education of san francisco unified school district for september 25, 2012 is now called to order. roll call please. (roll call). >> thank you. >> if you would like to join us for the pledge of allegiance. pledge one and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. okay. i get the first word. giants go. another world series champion. okay. seriously let's get back to the agenda. item a approval of board minutes for the regular minutes of march 13, 2012, august 14, 2012, september 11, 2012. is there a motion for all three? >> [inaudible] >> is there a second. >> second. >> any corrections? roll call please. >> thank you. >> yes. >> ms. (roll call. that is six aye's. >> thank you. presentations to the board of education superintendent report. superintendent carranza your thoughts for the evening. >> great thank you president yee. ladies and gentlemen and all of our parents listening at home. i wish you a good evening. thank you for b
. >> ms. (roll call. that is six aye's. >> thank you. presentations to the board of education superintendent report. superintendent carranza your thoughts for the evening. >> great thank you president yee. ladies and gentlemen and all of our parents listening at home. i wish you a good evening. thank you for being here in the board room. just a few thoughts to share with you. we are coming upon a very special election in the next few weeks and people will have an opportunity to vote and as you're deciding on candidates and ballot measures to vote for i would like to draw your attention to proposition 30 and 38. with the understanding that if these prop propositions pass they have significant impact on funding. if neither one passes financial resources will be greatly diminished for schools in california and specifically here in san francisco. the lodge cuts include that we will be forced to shorten the school year by five days this year and nine days next year in addition to the substantial cuts that will be at school sites and for students. i want to encourage all of
the allocation of the public education enrichment fund and then the budget also included the rainy day reserve appropriation to the schools. and just to note that the school district has been really very cooperative and helpful and diligent in establishing performance measures so that we can see what the success has been from the funds. and again, we will conduct an analysis beginning next year to review the good work that the school has done. supervisor mar: can i ask you the process for the roughly $40 million deferred funds that i feel is an obligation to pay to the school district and looks like in projections it's going to be close to $62 million by 20 15 -- 2015. can you talk about what's the process to pay that deferred amount to the school district? >> if the program is not renewed, that is if either the city chooses not to put it on the ballot or if it's put blonlt and fails, then we are required to pay that back within two years. after the end of the program. if the program is renewed, this deferral could essentially continue for the life of the program or could even be forgiven in t
will consider to measures to raise taxes for education. which one is better for schools? >> is hard to say which one is exactly better for schools because it depends on what your view of what works best in government. do you think should handle the money, who do you trust and how much you want to pay? let's compare proposition 38 and 30 >> guarantees politicians cannot touch it >> proposition 38 is waging a new campaign to funnel billions to our schools. attorney molly maunder is the biggest backer spending $20 million of art. she says the money will not go to the general fund but directly to the schools k through 12 and to early childhood programs. >> the money in 38 for the schools is barricaded from sacramento >> prop. 38 would raise the income taxes for almost anyone on a sliding scale. $75,000, you pay $1,082. 150,000, shell out 2700 in taxes and this will last for 12 years >> governor brown wants voters to support his ballot initiative, proposition 30. it raises sales tax a quarter percent for the next four years and raises income tax on those making more than $250,000 annual for the next
of the board of education, we do not have control over what the school district, the superintendent, and staffed due. i want to do everything i can as an ally on the board of supervisors to support the financial crisis. that is my intent moving this hearing forward. i want to say, first of all, we will have a couple of presentations from the school district and the city comptroller's office and then we will open up public comment, where a number of people will speak. i went to first introduced monique from the deputy city comptroller and matthew from the san francisco unified school district, the executive director of policy and operations. i would like ask if nancy can come and present on the financial crisis. >> good afternoon writ -- good afternoon. i am happy to present an update on the school district's budget for you. what you have in front of you is a pretty thorough update. i would be glad to respond to any requests to move along a little more quickly if that is something you would prefer. i just wanted to start by letting you know the guiding principles we have for our budg
, 2012 meeting of the joint meeting of the san francisco board of education and the san francisco board of supervisors. the city and school district select committee. my name is david campos and i am the chair of the committee. madam secretary, if you can please take the roll? before we do that i wanted to thank the following members of sfgtv staff who are covering the meeting today. mark bunch and bill dylan. madam secretary. >> did you want me to read the first item? >> roll call. >> roll call. we haven't had one. supervisor campos? >> present. >> supervisor olague? >> here. >> thank you. supervisor chu? >> he's in route. >> [speaker not understood]? >> here. >> [speaker not understood]? >> and commissioner mendosa. >> here. >> thank you very much. madam secretary, if you can please call item number 1. >> thank you, supervisor. it's item 120 3 93, hearing on the student drop out rates as introduced by supervisor cohen. >> this is an item that has been introduced by supervisor cohen. before i turn it over to supervisor cohen, i want to thank her for being here. i just wanted to sort of
moving forward to getting the right to vote. all of the suffragettes were interested in educating the new voters. >> non-partisan, not endorsing candidates >> -- endorsing candidates, getting the right to vote and one they have their voice heard. >> the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage is taking place throughout the state. bancroft library is having an exhibit that highlights the women's suffrage movement, chronicling what happened in california, bringing women the right to vote. >> how long does this mean going on? >> the week of the 20th. people do not realize that women were allowed to vote as early as the 1920's. in the library collection we have a manuscript from the end of december, possibly longer. >> in commemoration of 100 years of voting in california. 100 years ago this year, we won the right to vote. around 1911, this is how it would have addressed. and here we are, dressed the same. [chanting] >> we have the right to vote. >> whether you are marching for a cause or voting in the next election, make your voice heard. thank you for watching. >> good afternoon and welcome t
for teachers and the educational reforms they support. in president of the american federation of teachers, the chicago teachers' national union, wrote and i quote . . . weingarten, the president of the american federation of teachers, the chicago teachers' national union. randi, thank for joining us. >> it's always great to be with you, eliot. >> eliot: thank you. you did reform late the education conversation with the strike. explain what you wanted to do and what you think you accomplished? >> no one wants a strike, and a strike is to be avoided virtually at all no one goes into a strike willingly. but what happened in chicago was there has been 15 years of closing schools and teaching to the test as opposed to teaching children, so parents and the educators, together -- that's why parents supported the strike by a two to three to one basis, talked about how we need the tools for teachers, and resources for kids, so we make every single school in chicago a school where parents want to send their kids and educators want to work. a school where kids actually get pre
, african-american migration, outmigration. this is a huge factor. you are absolutely right about education, african americans cannot come back to san francisco if they don't feel confident that we can educate their students at a very high level. their children at a very high level to give them opportunity. so, education is a key part of this outmigration. and i think we should have a stronger partnership, really between the human rights commission that is working on this and our educational system because if you look at outmigration, we also have a part in that because when you look at these scores, anyone -- any middle class african-american person would look at these scores and say, i'm not moving back here because there's nowhere i can educate my children. and that is a very real reality. so, just to get back to also what our deputy superintendent is saying, we are trying to upset the culture that we've had for many decades in the school district. as you know it is like turning the titanic around. it is hard to change a culture. it is hard to change an infrastructure that is very, very
how vitally dependent the country is on a trained, educated, likable, young adult population. we have not quite recognized the deficit we have. as for the state level, a lot has happened. we work at the state level. we attempt to put together coalitions that recognize the importance of educating kids from conception to kindergarten. we are finding more business people who get the reality. they are understanding the situation and are increasingly ready to take action. in the area lisa pointed to, educating early solves educational problems. we published a report last march. it is on the website. it is a way to reduce special education costs. we know quality pre-kindergarten provided to 100 kids yields in reduction in special education costs alone enough to pay for the services. at the state level, there is an understanding that takes place that people can act on. it can better be done on the school district level. the power of technology is enabling people at local levels to act in ways they cannot at the federal level. as they act at the local and state level, it becomes clear that th
that were not given adequate education that they deserved yesterday, then i can talk about that. >> so, you probably know what the numbers were looking like 10 years ago as i was. thank you, mr. chair. that's all i have. >> colleagues, i'd like to turn it over to public comment. i think it's really important for us to hear from members of the public. so, i have a number of speaker cards that i'm going to read. but any member of the public who would like to speak on items 1 and 2, i would ask that you come forward. so, the speaker cards are from sharon hewett, robert woods, lilly ratcliff, jamil patterson, peter alexander, and ace washington. please come up. you each have two minutes. and we also have shaman walton. >>> hi, i'm [speaker not understood], and i did not fill out a card. i do apologize. one thing we're talking about solutions. first i wanted you to picture this. my kids' friends, when i encourage them to go back to school after they graduate, say, hey, i'm not going to live beyond 21. what for? there's hopelessness. solution, maybe we need cameras in the classrooms. maybe we nee
-speech and is with fire the foundation for individual rights and education. hadley, you were not very political. what happened? >> i have opinions but struggled what i believe, when to speak up, and when to be quiet. john: the because of friends ? >> there were a variety of students that were very mature but others who could be loudmouth that overshadows the culture with a small group to make a lot of noise it can be intimidating. congressmen tom 10 credo was invited but the speech never happened. john: he has positions on immigration that you disagree. i am not in alignment with his philosophy and every issue. tax policy but not by to buy another issues. i was not present the day they shutdown the event but many were shouting there is no debate. no-space 48. that hit home. >> he was shouted down. john: somewhere outside the building and throwing rocks through the window? >> university reacted and condemned the action. unc denounce. but some people did not want to have the debate. some think my views are so illegitimate i should not say them. john: you go to campuses around the country. most illibera
of the most important of the warren court. brown versus the board of education. vo: for years, sacramento politicians have chopped away funds for our schools. today, we're forty-seventh out of fifty in per-pupil funding. now these politicians say unless we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. >>> tonight we are taking a second look at earl warren one of the most popular governors in california history. he was elected to the state's top job three times in 1942, 1946 and 1950. he was so highly regarded that in 1946 he won the republican democratic and independent primaries and was unopposed in the general election. one of warren's major achievements at governor was to reform the prison system. bob mackenzie gives us a look at how two of the oldest california prisons changed at that time. >> reporter: by th
that he and the family provided. his contributions to our education community will be sorely missed, but for the generations to come forward for will provide, continue to provide the kind of education and job skills that we need for our city. over the last few weeks, i have been working closely with the city college to assess their fiscal, managerial, and accreditation issues. i want to thank the people behind me. in particular, the interim chancellor pamela fisher is here, and the current trustees, natalie burke is here today, i need a barrier is also here. thank you very much. also representing our students, mr. walker is here as well. [applause] with any educational institution that has value as our city college, not only did we work with those that are currently involved with them, but we worked as a city family. there is no way to express at this time the need to have this a family together to support our city college. so also i have representatives of the comptroller's office, then rosenfield, mickey callahan, the human resources divisions that are here today, nadia from our p
, those are things that have to have been at the san francisco board of education, not at this committee. we do not legally have the authority to direct the school district, which is a separate legal entity, to do anything. we hope to provide information today writ with that, i will turn it over to the school district. >> good afternoon. i am the executive director of the educational placement center. i am going to give you an update in terms of a transitional kindergarten program. district staff has been working for the past few weeks to work on implementation. we have processed all the applications that have been coming in. we give parents and families an extended time line when we announced that we were expanding the program to 5 sites instead of the two originally offered. we have a little bit over 190 applicants who have come back to apply for our transitional kindergarten program and we will be offering it at the five sites that we previously announced. what we have also refined is our placement and assignment process for the transitional kindergarten. mr. trout has passed out a do
is innovation, we continue to lead on this. how do we take that creative engine and get it to k-12 education so we we can see improvements and qualities and outcomes and achievements for our students? >> if you look through history, whether it is transportation, our children listed in age that our ancestors could only dream of. we have computers, we have all sorts of new things. that really doesn't seem to happen until k-12 education. if you look at research and development, in k-12 education, it is one 15th the rate, of the u.s. economy overall. it is 152-1100 rate of what we see in innovative sectors like health care. what is getting in the way? well, what we try to do is first diagnosed what is giving away. i wonder standing back, we see what can we do about it. and that is essentially a layer in which we hope to create a creative marketplace that succeeds in what normally seems to be stagnant. we have k-12 schools, 14,000 school systems. we have would-be innovators and entrepreneurs. if something seems to be separating us. what is going on in the middle? this is underlined a lot of other co
now, you asked -- supervisor cohen, you asked when did this start, when did this education drop off. it started before you were born. it's been happening a long time. so, when you said -- when you said it takes a healthy community, that means working. healthy -- if you don't work, you don't eat. and, so, this is what we're trying to do in bayview hunters point. i come here with a message for you to appeal to your better wisdom and your judgment because that's what [inaudible]. >> thank you very much, sir. >>> thank you, sir. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >>> i'm even too old to really address this because i'm over 10 years removed. but i can remember when tupac died and one of my cool teachers put "we love you, tupac" a picture of him in the class. and the principal told her to remove it. and that just points to the disconnect. i mean, instead of trying to get me to understand shakespeare first, who i might not like or don't care about, try to show me how writing a thesis is equivalent to writing a good song. you've got to meet the youth where they're at. and what i see from
full well many students who have not been able to participate in college education. and even in [speaker not understood], because by the way, you have to be academically ready to ascend and not just be at the labor reer level. -- laborer level. so, i'm happy, supervisor cohen, and president chiu, you understand where we are at and we are not turning a blind aye to this issue -- [multiple voices] >> thank you, commissioner. commissioner fewer. >> yes, i'd like to comment a little bit about looking at the state. quite frankly, when i saw this data, i myself was very, very shocked particularly about the students not on track for graduation. supervisor, i share your concern. i think as far as the pathway, this is a pathway to nowhere. so, i just want to emphasize about the difference between feel better and do better. i know if you're not really in this conversation all the time, what does it really mean when we give two sets of data that say, on track c or better and on track d or better. on that track d or better is a lie, it is a lie to all our students because we instituted a
at this testimony. i would like to begin by thanking you for your genuine passion on this topic can educate all americans about the importance. i know is we've spent time over the years, we think about of course your home state and robust aviation community in the state of wisconsin and what happens over the course of the most spectacular week of the year at the oshkosh air show with bea. and with that said tamayo so juxtaposed my thoughts and comments regarding matches the home base of operation that i come from at new york's john f. kennedy airport, the congestion in the air space challenges have across places like the metropolitan area and here i am the metropolitan area. all of this site, mr. chairman and certainly two ranking member costello as well, and over the years, you have certainly been passionate about pursuing just real meaningful solutions to these problems as if they had been in your congressional districts across the country and we certainly appreciate that as an industry. your palate hearings, conduct of information on sessions and have an open door as he sought not to assign
. and everything, all five issues, education, economic development, all those issues are something that's been passed down under, hasn't been taken care of. i'm glad to see the education part of this is coming forth because without the ebbv indication we cannot have nothing. i'm here to say and ed lee, hear me loud and clear because it starts from room 200. everything that -- all these boards, they're listening right now. mr. ed lee, this a-c-e and i'm telling you i'm on the case and we're going make sure that we implement this outmigration in my lifetime for my three kids. the thing about it, why i'm so adamant, ladies and gentlemen, i've been doing this for 20 years. but i have children that have children that have children. so, therefore, i'm here representing three cs. it is sort of historical. yes, i'm 58 years old, but i have great grand kids and all be damned that i've been here all these 20 years and when i'm in the position to help out their generation, they can say pa-pa helped us. i want to be the pa-pa for all my african-american community because it seems like our leadership is in
with the new budget cuts. of course, my university is being privatized. all of the higher education is being privatized. all through the uc system. how do you run a modern state with tax cuts? we resort to desperate, back last november, we were asked to vote to make four indian casinos in san diego county pony up money. i thought this was a joke. they voted to do it. now, the governor proposes to borrow against future revenues. how did they deal with these social problems when the economic problems were far worse than what we can imagine today? this is from larry halprin's. and it has these quotes from roosevelt on the wall. he said in one of his talks to the people, "the test is not whether we have more, it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little". it's a different philosophy than that which we have become used to. what i am going to show you is a lost civilization. it's a strange place. and yet, it becomes oddly familiar after a while because we built it and use it every day without knowing it. it has been buried. the living new deal project is like an archaeological dig
conversation for us to have with our families because so much of our education system is rooted in mediocrity. so, trying to convince our families that there is a better should not have been a conversation we were spending any time on, and we did. and it took us a year to get through that. there has been growth in the last three years. it's slow, and it's not enough and we acknowledge that. we're starting to see a lot of the blending of services both at the city and the school district, which include after school and out of school time. and i think that that has been a tremendous support for so many of our kids. but i also want to acknowledge that all of our 21st century funding has been eliminated in our high schools and that has impact. and these are the constant things that we're dealing with. we work off of a budget that's projected and then we're told you really don't have that money. so, the scaling up and then scaling back is just part of our reality. and it's not an excuse, but it's a reality. but we continue to invest in our communities and we continue to invest in our schools. and i
are perhaps the most important innovation in public education over the last generation in the united states. but there are many myths and misconceptions about charters and about the motivation and the goal of many in the movement. use of some of that play out in the recent chicago future strike. beyond that there are many people in the united states to the best charters are either an unmitigated good or alternatively, an existential threat. .. >> if we are going to get back to the living standards of america, we are only going to do that by lifting up and truly changing public education in this country. that is the only way that is ever going to be achieved. so with that, let me introduce roland fryer. he is going to summarize his paper. he is going to do 34 slides in one hour. >> thank you very much. it is great to be here again and to see so many familiar faces. >> let's start with this first. good morning. we all know that education in america, visited the show that our performance has grown over the last 30 to 40 years. if you look at the latest statistics as to how many schools didn't
is the first time i met you. i'm a product of a public school. every bit of my education has been k through 12 has been through public school. so, i'm trying to figure out at what point -- what point do we start to lose this battle? that's why i asked for the longitudinal study the last ten years. it would be great if we could go even further back than that. i'm going to -- mr. arm entrout, i want to ask you to follow-up to get the answers to the questions that i propose here today. this last question really is -- i'm just looking for a better understanding, i've got? some concrete solutionses that the unified school district is going to be implementing to help combat these high drop-out rates. * i've heard some solutions today about the partnerships that you've passed, that -- partnerships with the city and the cbos and i've heard about a through g requirementses. i agree like many other members, a through g should be the standard no matter what. i do remember when i came through, i graduated -- there were some students who did finish with a through g and some didn't but still were
." michelle rhee is the head of students first, an organization that hopes to reform public education. she, of course, is the former head ofure d.c. schools. former speaker newt gingrich is rejoining us. he does not have a new book out, but his wife calista, does have a new book out, a children's book that will be coming out tomorrow. bob woodward, an associate editor of the "washington post" is the author of "the price of politics" he's written more books than this entire table combined. well, maybe not when you put newt gingrich in there. and pulitzer prize-winning author hendrick smith who has a new book called, "who stole the american dream?" all you people are here to sell books. that's pretty clear. ( laughter ) no, i'm teasing. we're glad to have all of you. mark zandi, let's just talk about what is the state of the american economy right now with just five weeks before we get to this election? the job numbers came out this week on tuesday. we had some very good economic news. housing numbers were up. consumer confidence was up. reports of companies hiring for the holidays seem to
network, but i'm also the mother of an african-american son, and i'm a former educator of some of the brightest children that i've ever met at willie brown academy. all of our children are brilliant. we know this. and i would like to thank the elected leaders and community leaders who convened this hearing this evening. you know, i worry not only about the well-being of my former students who are now freshmen in high school, but i also worry about their parents and how well equipped they are to support their children throughout their now high school journey. as studies have documented, a key component to student success are strong school family partnership and solid parent involvement. now, as the powers that be determine whether or not a task force is ultimately convened on this very important matter, i implore that you mandate parent representation within this group and a parent education component on the overall matter. there are a wealth of parents facing organizations in the city, magic coleman, parents for public schools and a number of others. please use us as content ex
? commissioner wynn. >>i would like to appoint brian fox to the public education enenrichment committee. >> yes, i have two and -- [inaudible] to the public education enrichment fund. >> any others? okay. seeing none let's move on to the next item. this is the item l, special order of business. i now call the public hearing and adoption of the tentative agreement between the district and the international federation of technical engineers, local 21. is there a motion? >> so moved. >> is there a second? >> second. >> reading of recommendation by superintendent or designee. >> thank you president yee. this say tentative agreement that we reached with local 21 r and extension of the existing collective bargaining agreement and we ask that the board adopt that agreement and the required public disclosure requirements. i want to thank the bargaining teams from local 21. they represent our it work force. >> so there's no public speakers that signed up for this and are there comments from the board or the superintendent? seeing none roll call please. >> thank you. (calling roll). >> seven aye
and pacific islanders were receiving a different quality of education. in 2007 we found that african-americans were ranked dead last in api scores for all major urban school districts in california. this was the low below even special education students in their api scores for [speaker not understood]. the next year coleman fought for the board of education to close the achievement gap. that resolution to ensure the upcoming district strategic plan was focused on addressing the racial achievement grape in inequity in our school. thankfully the board passed that unanimously. however, the gap has widened, especially for african-american students. many of you might have seen the report that came out talking about the 2011 released analysis comparing the progress of california school districts. unfortunately san francisco received an overall grade of d. and in particular the african-american students as it relates to sfusd, we ranked 127 out of 128. i want to have one of our parent leaders, olivia gudeau, give a statement. >> hi, my name is olivia harris. i am a san francisco resident,
education. but there are so many different issues that are a part of this that this would be a disservice to the community if we only, you know, tackled that issue. and i think that what commissioner mendoza said is absolutely true, that the school district is not going to be able to deal with this on its own. there are so many different issues that have to be a part of the discussion. so, my suggestion would be that, that it may be through supervisor olague's office that we form a small working group of folks, and then come back, you know, to the committee, that we continue this item to the call of the chair so that we have an ongoing discussion. but i think it's really important to the members of the community who took the time to be here, to make sure that we don't drop this ball, if you will, and that we do -- that we continue to move this forward. i do want to acknowledge the deputy superintendent to see if he wants to add anything to this presentation. you know, it's not easy for a school district to have these issues discussed in this way, and i appreciate the fact that we are havi
of the energy solution investments in education and infrastructure. so we'll talk about how to move forward billing off of the last four years. >> eliot: all of that is clear and i think correct. but it doesn't fully answer what will happen. john boehner odds are, is still likely to be speaker of the house. >> sure. >> eliot: in which case you will have a tough negotiation with him. can you pledge to the american people that you will stand rigid in opposing extension of the bush tax cuts for the wealthiest americans? >> the president's economic team knows they have a mountain to climb in front of them in terms of dealing with congress. the congressional leadership on the republican side came together the day the president was nominated and said we care more about score political points than working with this president. change comes by engaging people outside of washington, and putting pressure on the leakership in congress. so that's what we are going to do, and continue to do that, we hope the speaker and other republican leaders will come to the table. this is a time
of school time, youth leadership and department development support education out dumb comeses. and i'll give you examples of acat this timetionv we've funded so far that helps to bridge the gap. -- activities. what has made us unique in the current and upcoming cycle is we have made education our focus for three years and the upcoming three-year. ultimately want to make sure our students are ready to learn and are succeeding in school. and more importantly we cannot be doing these without addressing some of the preconditions. as supervisor cohen asked earlier how can we fixed this, there is education effort. we must address student needs, wellness and also safety. our stretch goals are to make sure that every child is ready to learn. every child is ready when they are beginning high school, every youth enters high school ready to succeed and when they are finished with high school they're ready to transition to adulthood. you'll see each of our strategies are broken out to target early care education, kindergarten through 8, out of school time and work with students who are in ninth
of the worst academic test scores in the country. what do you think should be done to better the educational system? >> i think that is an important question, especially for our economy. i want to point out one thing. she posed for sequestration and now says it will not happen. can you imagine that kind of leadership? she goes for the fiscal cliff and now she says it will not happen. let's talk about education. this is the problem i see. we have a department of education in washington. they have 3500 employees that make over $100,000 a year. they are dictating to the school district how to do their jobs. i think that is a shame and it is wrong. i am not talking about closing down the department of education. i have never said that and never will. can we reduce the size of that department of education and get that money down to the school district? i believe the best education for children in nevada comes between parents, teachers, and principles. -- principals. those are who should be making the decisions. >> if i could quickly comment. my opponent mentioned my vote on sequestration. just a
time and again, touches on, again, education attainment issues. >> i guess at some point in my -- i wonder if we can track some of this. are we tracking it? >> we do have tracking for a number of youth. a breakdown of that demographic. >> i guess the students that are maybe not achieving at the level that we'd like to see, i'd like to understand of those -- of that population that were placed in jobs, what were the challenges they found. >> of course. >> i know that in one instance we found that it was hard for some of the young people, they didn't have computer access. it was hard for them to fill out the applications and that sort of thing. it was just basic on that level. and then we found that in a couple of instances we provided some support groups for young people to talk about what the challenges were that they had met with successful. these were almost voluntary -- we worked with the y and we worked with west side services to provide some of those support groups. and we had a couple in some instances. i think it would be good to have the young people kind of give input as to
and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future,
the time needed to build up a great community of people sharing cars. that lets us find great cars, educate the owners, educate the renters, and ensure there is the right balance and variety of cars. if you look on the site in san francisco, you will literally see cars all over the place. it is all over the bay area. you are seeing cars sharing happening in places it never had before. we worked with the city to see if there were any ways we could get out the word. we hope to work with existing programs or be added as an additional transportation solution. in general, we like to involve the city and city leaders in our announcement of coming to market, and it has been working really well. >> i know you have community managers all over the globe. what's going on there? >> airbnb goes to network effects. we are all over in -- we are already in 19 cities all over the world. we just provide the tools on line, and local residents throughout the world decide they want to be part of the movement and part of airbnb and list their homes on the site, and local travelers decide they want to go somewhe
really good teachers who wanted me to succeed and who cared about my education. but the next year i had teachers who didn't believe i could make it. it's not fair because every student deserves a quality education no matter what their background is. i feel like other black students have had worse experiences than me. i have a parent who works for sfusd and people at school like my teachers know who my mother is and it makes a difference in the experience that i had. when you have someone constantly telling you that you can't do something and can't succeed it gets in your head and you start to believe it. like internalized depression, you start to believe that you're stupid and you can't be successful. i do not necessarily think that sfusd has set me up for success. i had teachers who didn't believe in me in past grades that followed me that didn't necessarily reflect me. they reflect the struggles that i was going through that year. this year i have up to 36 kids in a class and students have trouble getting help from the teacher with that many people in the classroom. i didn't know tha
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